Educational Forum with Clinical Studies Current Science and Research

February 26, 2011

Electrotherapy and Tissue Repair. Xanya Sofra Weiss

Electrotherapy is one form of intervention that has the capacity to influence the processes associated with tissue repair. Some modalities are more effective at achieving this than others, and there are differences in they type of tissue that respond to the different modalities. Numerous electrotherapy modalities have significant clinical effects, but not primarily on tissue repair, and they are excluded from this review for this reason.
Evidence for the relationship between electrotherapy and tissue repair is continuously updated and thus, this is the story is it is at the moment – the current state of the art. It is fully expected that this will change – maybe next month, maybe next year – and therefore the latter section of this paper considers some of the emerging issues.

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic fluid originate neural precursors with functional voltage-gated sodium channels. Xanya Sofra Weiss

Katia Mareschi , Deborah Rustichelli, Valentina Comunanza, Roberta De Fazio, Cristina Cravero, Giulia Morterra,Barbara Martinoglio, Enzo Medico, Emilio Carbone, Chiara Benedetto and Franca Fagioli

Background aims
Amniotic fluid (AF) contains stem cells with high proliferative and differentiative potential that might be an attractive source of multipotent stem cells. We investigated whether human AF contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and evaluated their phenotypic characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro.
Methods:
AF was harvested during routine pre-natal amniocentesis at 14–16 weeks of pregnancy. AF sample pellets were plated in α-minimum essential medium (MEM) with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). We evaluated cellular growth, immunophenotype, stemness markers and differentiative potential during in vitro expansion.
Neural progenitor maintenance medium (NPMM), a medium normally used for the growth and maintenance of neural stem cells, containing hFGF, hEGF and NSF-1, was used for neural induction.
Results:
Twenty-seven AF samples were collected and primary cells, obtained from samples containing more than 6 mL AF, had MSC characteristics. AF MSC showed high proliferative potential, were positive for CD90, CD105, CD29, CD44, CD73 and CD166, showed Oct-4 and Nanog molecular and protein expression, and differentiated into osteoblasts, adypocytes and chondrocytes. The NPMM-cultured cells expressed neural markers and increased Na+ channel density and channel inactivation rate, making the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive channels more kinetically similar to native neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels.
Conclusions:
These data suggest that AF is an important multipotent stem cell source with a high proliferative potential able to originate potential precursors of functional neurons.

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Anti-inflammatory Effects of Electronic Signal Treatment. Xanya Sofra Weiss

Robert H. Odell, Jr., MD, PhD, Richard E. Sorgnard, PhD; 2008

Inflammation often plays a key role in the perpetuation of pain. Chronic inflammatory conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis, immune system dysfunction, micro-circulatory disease, painful neuritis, and even heart disease) have increased as baby boomers age. Medicine’s current antiinflammatory choices are NSAIDs and steroids; the value in promoting cure and side effect risks of these medications are unclear and controversial, especially considering individual patient variations. Electricity has continuously been a powerful tool in medicine for thousands of years. All medical professionals are, to some degree, aware of electrotherapy; those who directly use electricity for treatment know of its anti-inflammatory effects. Electronic signal treatment (EST), as an extension of presently available technology, may reasonably have even more anti-inflammatory effects. EST is a digitally produced alternating current sinusoidal electronic signal with associated harmonics to produce theoretically reasonable and/or scientifically documented physiological effects when applied to the human body. These signals are produced by advanced electronics not possible even 10 to 15 years ago. The potential long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects of some electrical currents are based on basic physical and biochemical facts listed in the text below, namely that of stimulating and signaling effective and long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects in nerve and muscle cells. The safety of electrotherapeutic treatments in general and EST in particular has been established through extensive clinical use. The principles of physics have been largely de-emphasized in modern medicine in favor of chemistry. These electrical treatments, a familiar application of physics, thus represent powerful and appropriate elements of physicians’ pain care armamentaria in the clinic and possibly for prescription for use at home to improve overall patient care and maintenance of quality of life via low-risk and potentially curative treatments.

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Xanya Sofra Weiss

November 23, 2010

Multiple Sclerosis: Low-Frequency Temporal Blood Oxygen Level– Dependent Fluctuations Indicate Reduced Functional Connectivity —Initial Results.

PURPOSE: To study the correlation of low-frequency blood oxygenation level– dependent (BOLD) fluctuations on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained of the left- and right hemisphere primary motor regions in healthy control subjects and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 20 patients with MS underwent MR imaging with a 1.5-T imager by using a protocol designed to monitor low-frequency BOLD fluctuations. Data for low-frequency BOLD fluctuations were acquired with subjects at rest and during continuous performance of a bilateral fingertapping task. These data were low-pass filtered

Xanya Sofra Weiss

September 5, 2010

Effect of Microcurrent Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: A Double-Blind Comparison. xanya sofra weiss

Jennifer D. Allen, MEd, ATC, Carl G. Mattacola, PhD, ATC, and David H. Perrin, PhD, ATC; 1999

Objective:
To examine the efficacy of microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) treatment on pain and loss of range of motion (ROM) associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
Design and Setting:
We assigned subjects to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received treatment with microcurrent stimulation (200 μA, 30 Hz, for 10 minutes, then 100 μA, 0.3 Hz, for 10 minutes) 24, 48, and 72 hours after DOMS induction. Group 2 served as a sham group and was treated using a machine altered by the manufacturer so that no current could flow through the electrodes.
Subjects:
DOMS was induced in the biceps brachii of the nondominant arm of 18 subjects (3 males, 15 females: age = 20.33 ± 2.3 years, ht = 170.81 ± 7.3 cm, wt = 69.61 ± 13.1 kg). Dominance was defined as the arm used by the subject to throw a ball.
Measurements:
Subjective pain and active elbow extension ROM were evaluated before and after treatment each day. Two methods were used to assess pain: constant pressure using a weighted Orthoplast sphere and full elbow extension to the limit of pain tolerance. Subjective pain was measured with a graphic rating scale and active elbow extension ROM using a standard, plastic, double-armed goniometer. Three repeated-measures ANOVAs (between-subjects variable was group, within- subjects variables were day and test) were used to assess ROM and pain scores for the 2 groups.
Results:
We found no significant difference in the measurement of subjective pain scores or elbow extension ROM when the MENS group was compared with the sham group.
Conclusions:
Our results indicate that the MENS treatment, within the parameters used for this experiment, was not effective in reducing the pain or loss of ROM associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness.

Xanya Sofra Weiss

Xanya Sofra Weiss

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